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Marek Bednarz (maro)
Insider
From: Poland
Posts: 224
I've tried it just now. The only thing that gets saved is the login page in html format.
“Progress comes to those who train and train; reliance on secret techniques will get you nowhere.” - Morihei Ueshiba
2011-03-21 18:35
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Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
iconmaro:
I've tried it just now. The only thing that gets saved is the login page in html format.

That is very odd. Here is the link that I provided:
http://www.coticule.be/contao/popup.php?src=tl_files/PDF%20articles/UniCot-methode-PO.pdf&download=1
I suspect that your browser drops everything that comes after the "contao/". That would indeed take you to the login page for the back end.

Here's an alternative link (that actually points to the same location):
http://www.coticule.be/tl_files/PDF%20articles/UniCot-methode-PO.pdf

I hope this one works.

Matt already sent me a script to fix a special secret Polish way to deal with hyphens. He said that the script will deal with it automatically (when I run it), so you don't have to correct hyphen mistakes. (I think:-/ ).

Kind regards,
Bart.
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2011-03-21 23:16
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Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
I just submitted the Italian verison of Unicot, thanks to Dov Prombaum, who some of you might no better by his forum moniker Chimensh. Thank you Dov. I owe you one. :thumbup:

I also submitted the hopefully final copy of the French Dilucot version, thanks to Laurent Planckaert and Wim Decraene. They are not so far away as Italy, I will feed them beer for their work hopefully anytime soon. :)

Cheers,
Bart.
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2011-03-21 23:22
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Marek Bednarz (maro)
Insider
From: Poland
Posts: 224
The second link worked for me. File downloaded. I'll let you (Bart + Matt) know in case of any suggestions.
“Progress comes to those who train and train; reliance on secret techniques will get you nowhere.” - Morihei Ueshiba
2011-03-22 18:37
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Matt
Associate
From: Poland
Posts: 1047
iconBart:
Matt already sent me a script to fix a special secret Polish way to deal with hyphens. He said that the script will deal with it automatically (when I run it), so you don't have to correct hyphen mistakes. (I think:-/ ).


It actually fixes conjunctions (a, i, o, u, w, z - and, about, at, in, with), which are not supposed to be at the end of the line in Polish. It doesn't do anything with hyphenation. Bart, when we're all done with tweaking, you can send me an .indd file, I'll just apply Polish dictionary to it, and that will handle proper hyphenation.

best regards,
Matt

PS. Maro, please don't bother translating the image captions/descriptions, I've already done that, too.
"Very interesting indeed :) I did something similar with cheese a while ago" - Dr Ralfson
2011-03-22 21:11
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Bart
website administrator
Posts: 24
Finished version of the Unicot article in French has been published:
http://www.coticule.be/tl_files/PDF%20articles/UniCot-methode-FR.pdf

With sincerest thanks to Laurent and WIm,
Bart.
2011-04-12 18:55
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Oscar
Posts: 5
Hi.
I don´t know if the translation offer is still on, but I coul work in a Portuguese (from Brazil) version translation based on the english/italian versions if you guys think it´s valid.
But I have to be honest that there are some words like "coticule" that the official translation is still pending. I mean nobody translated that so far as far as I know.

Regards.

Oscar
2011-07-27 00:37
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geruchtemoaker
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 693
iconOscar:
Hi.
I don´t know if the translation offer is still on, but I coul work in a Portuguese (from Brazil) version translation based on the english/italian versions if you guys think it´s valid.
But I have to be honest that there are some words like "coticule" that the official translation is still pending. I mean nobody translated that so far as far as I know.

Regards.

Oscar
I think coticule should be translated as coticule

kind regards
Stijn
The Bible and several other self help or enlightenment books cite the Seven Deadly Sins. They are: pride, greed, lust, envy, wrath, sloth, and gluttony. That pretty much covers everything that we do, that is sinful... or fun for that matter. - Dave Mustaine
http://www.artisanshaving.org
2011-07-27 01:14
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Paul
Advisor
From: United States
Posts: 1388
icongeruchtemoaker:
I think coticule should be translated as coticule

kind regards
Stijn


That's what translate.google.com and I say too :D
Paul
"Focus on the journey, not the destination. Joy is found not in finishing an activity but in doing it" - Greg Anderson
my blog- and it works again :p
2011-07-27 01:30
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Oscar
Posts: 5
icongeruchtemoaker:
iconOscar:
Hi.
I don´t know if the translation offer is still on, but I coul work in a Portuguese (from Brazil) version translation based on the english/italian versions if you guys think it´s valid.
But I have to be honest that there are some words like "coticule" that the official translation is still pending. I mean nobody translated that so far as far as I know.

Regards.

Oscar
I think coticule should be translated as coticule

kind regards
Stijn


Maybe we can turn it official. But I am sure I will have to go to the origin of the word, because in portuguese we have "cutícula" (related to finger nails) and also "cotícula"( related to stone/gold). But none aproches to the meaning of hone.
But that´s the catch about translation.:)
Regards.
2011-07-27 01:41
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danjared
Moderator
From: United States
Posts: 1000
There's no word? That's funny, considering that Ardennes uses Portuguese slate to back their non-combination hones.
2011-07-27 01:51
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Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
Coticule is the name of the both the rock and the hones made from it. The word has Latin roots, and I can imagine other Latin languages, such as Portuguese having very similar words in their vocabulary. But Coticule (note that I always write it with a capital) is world-wide the scientifically accepted nomen for this particular type of rock.
The Germans refer to the hones as "Belgischer Brocken", but I think it is best to stick with Coticule in a language that has no widely used word for these hones. In instances where confusion would be possible, one can specify: "Belgian Coticule hone".

Translations of Sharpening Academy articles in any language are always welcome.

Best regards,
Bart.
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2011-07-27 14:21