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Catalin Sorescu (csorescu)
From: Romania
Posts: 2
iconBart:
iconcsorescu:
Bart, may I translate the articles in Romanian language?
I am a coticule enthusiast and I advocate Belgian hones in Romania.

-Catalin
http://csorescu.wordpress.com/


But of course. We have a couple of members from Romania, maybe they'll chime in to offer you assistance.

Nice woodworking tools on that website.:) I understand that you sell Coticules in Romania? If you want to be linked in out recommended links section, let me know.

Kind regards,
Bart.


Thank you Bart! I'll try to translate some of your articles in romanian language!
Yes, I sell belgian stones in Romania and, as far as I know, I am the only one that matters at this moment! :) There is another company that sells some coticule stones but their prices are at least 2.5X greater than the prices suggested by Ardennes-Coticule. I am wondering if they ever sold one!
I got the stones directly from Maurice and I got at least 5kg per month since 10 months. So, I'm very new in this boat! Hope to learn more from you guys!
If you're so kind, please link my page: http://csorescu.wordpress.com/for-sale/
I always sell at suggested prices by Ardennes-Coticule or less! I never overcharge for belgian stones!
Sorry for this OT!
Best regards,
-Catalin
2010-12-07 21:54
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Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
Done.
http://www.coticule.be/Rec_web.html

Kind regards,
Bart.
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2010-12-07 22:05
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Woodash
+1
Posts: 202
iconBart:
I'd say that your English is very far from stumbling.


iconQuote:
I'll try to clarify the problem with an example:

I wrote in a thread yesterday:
iconQuote:
even the smoothest feeling honing surface still looks like a cobblestone path at a submicron level

In this particular case I believe I was lucky. I knew the word "cobblestone" and it expressed exactly what I wanted to say.
Actually that makes you guys lucky, because in the other case I would have written "even the smoothest feeling honing surface still carries many protrusions at a submicron level, albeit not spiky ones that would take chips out the edge, but more a sort of smooth microscopical bumps that ever so slightly squash the very tip of the bevel together".
And that is precisely the kind of elaborative writing that clutters up the articles in the sharpening academy.I find it extremely difficult to predict whether a reader will likely grasp a particular notion or whether that requires a couple of additional subordinate clauses. A native speaker has a feel for these things. But I don't. And that becomes painfully apparent when my writing needs to be translated.

Kind regards,
Bart.

Actually, in this case, I think your particular choice of words is both elegant and efficient/descriptive. It's a perfect metaphor without being boring or 'fluffy'. You could have said 'even the smoothest feeling honing surface has a lot of relief at the microscopic level' - or something like that - but I prefer your terminology to tell you the truth.
==================
....WHOOPS!....
Steve
2010-12-07 22:44
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Matt
Associate
From: Poland
Posts: 1047
Oh, my. I know we've been here several times already, but...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9ANL8L8RG0&NR=1

Skip to 9:22, because this is what popped into my mind when I was reading this. :lol:

No disrespect of course!

cheers!
Matt
"Very interesting indeed :) I did something similar with cheese a while ago" - Dr Ralfson
2010-12-08 11:05
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DENNIS KELLY (DJKELLY)
+1
From: United States
Posts: 774
iconMatt:
Oh, my. I know we've been here several times already, but...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9ANL8L8RG0&NR=1

Skip to 9:22, because this is what popped into my mind when I was reading this. :lol:

No disrespect of course!

cheers!
Matt

We're not back to "sod" are we?

In a little more serious light--if you need some specific help with this project, Bart, I will be glad to contribute. It looks to me as if you have it covered for now, but let me know.
STAMP OUT QUICKSAND
2010-12-08 16:11
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Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
iconMatt:
Oh, my. I know we've been here several times already, but...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9ANL8L8RG0&NR=1

Skip to 9:22, because this is what popped into my mind when I was reading this. :lol:

No disrespect of course!

cheers!
Matt

:D :D :D No, Better not! :D
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2010-12-08 20:47
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chti_lolo
Posts: 376
iconBart:
it became painfully apparent to me how poorly written these articles are in English

I have made a french translation of unicot,dilucot,new BBW procedure and will have time during Xmas holidays to do some more translations (honing strokes...) and find the use of circumlocution sometimes more clear than the use of a native word. There is not always an "idoine" word in french for the english word and sometimes there are two or three words with faint nuances that even french people may ignore.

BTW, cobblestones is what can be found on Paris-Roubaix roads;) ?

Regards

Laurent
2010-12-09 21:33
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danjared
From: United States
Posts: 1000
iconchti_lolo:

BTW, cobblestones is what can be found on Paris-Roubaix roads;) ?


As any cyclist will very affirmatively say: "YES!"
2010-12-09 22:17
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DG7
From: United States
Posts: 61
One day, I'll be sure to ride the Pavé! And visit Ardennes, too.
2010-12-09 22:42
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Woodash
+1
Posts: 202
iconchti_lolo:
BTW, cobblestones is what can be found on Paris-Roubaix roads;) ?

Oh yeah!...and mud, and skin, and sweat, and....tough race indeed!
==================
....WHOOPS!....
Steve
2010-12-09 23:26
Avatar
Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
iconchti_lolo:
iconBart:
it became painfully apparent to me how poorly written these articles are in English

I have made a french translation of unicot,dilucot,new BBW procedure and will have time during Xmas holidays to do some more translations (honing strokes...) and find the use of circumlocution sometimes more clear than the use of a native word. There is not always an "idoine" word in french for the english word and sometimes there are two or three words with faint nuances that even french people may ignore.

BTW, cobblestones is what can be found on Paris-Roubaix roads;) ?

Regards

Laurent

Circumlocution... I had to look that one up.:) I agree, but only to a certain degree. If the provided information in a technical text is overly elucidated(I plea guilty), then most people will start reading diagonally. And might miss a couple key concepts while doing that.

Don't be afraid to reread the translations and remove all redundant phrases. And please reformulate everything you think should be written more clear. I remain convinced that a good translation of these text involves an fair deal of rewriting.


Thanks,
Bart.
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2010-12-10 10:22
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Matt
Associate
From: Poland
Posts: 1047


"Very interesting indeed :) I did something similar with cheese a while ago" - Dr Ralfson
2010-12-10 11:56
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Paul
Advisor
From: United States
Posts: 1388
Matt,

Paste a "Thanks" button in your post. Bart really likes them and has been trying his best to figure out how to integrate them in the software. :thumbup:
Paul
"Focus on the journey, not the destination. Joy is found not in finishing an activity but in doing it" - Greg Anderson
my blog- and it works again :p
2010-12-23 05:53
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Bruno
Posts: 40
I have some experience with translating technical texts, English to Dutch and Dutch to English.
What many people fail to realize is that you cannot just translate paragraph per paragraph, sentence per sentence. Because the end result will feel very awkward indeed. You should translate what the paragraph is trying to say, and not just what it says. Every language has certain ways of structuring sentences, and certain accepted ways of saying things. These will be different in every language.

So the problem is not necessarily related to the English texts.
I've quickly scanned through the English Unicot text, and while it was a bit wordy (I suffer the same affliction) it was not poorly written. Yet I can easily see Dutch translations becoming very awkward in a line by line translation.

Imo, it wouldn't hurt to tighten up the English version, but I don't think that any translation attempts will be made much easier by that. It will still be a work requiring the rephrasing of texts and meanings.

Silly example of something I was typing just now in a forum post. I used the phrase 'throwing you a bone here' which can mean something like doing you a favor via a specific action. It is plain impossible to come up with a translation (ik gooi hier een bot naar je toe) that makes any sense at all. To translate that you need to discard the words and focus on what the words mean.

For technical texts, this issue is a bit more subtle since you would not use phrases like that. however, the issue would still exist in different ways. If you tweak your English texts so that they are easier to translate in Dutch, then it will perhaps be more difficult to translate it in French, Croatian or Japanese.
[Last edited by Bruno, 2010-12-23 08:14]
2010-12-23 08:04
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Robin
Posts:
Bruno,

That pretty much sums up the old problem of translation/interpretation. My German translation sticks closely to the meaning of the English text, but reads differently. Because German and English are slightly different. Pick an arbitrary English book and its German translation, and you will see that the German version is about 30% thicker. I presume Italian would be 300%, but that is just guess.

For future reference, a good, terse summary would be useful. Just to ensure that the gist of the article gets translated properly.

Paul,

Here is your thank you button:



Regards,
Robin
2010-12-23 08:04