Rules of conduct

Welcome at the Cafeteria! Here you can exchange ideas with Coticule users
from around the globe.
Please make sure you understand our forum rules!

Read more …
Avatar
tim stevenson (pedalpowersailing)
From: United Kingdom
Posts: 81
not sure if we have debated this before but several months ago I honed 3 old razors - nothing special just ones I had aquired.

After stropping I simply pout them away and left them

Over the past 10 days I have shaved with each one and they were scary sharp

I am wondering was I extremely good at honing these 3 or did the few months rest allow the blade to settle and show its true sharpness

I am now trying to work out whether indeed the passing of time helps?

I really do not think so BUT.......
tim stevenson
2011-10-07 10:49
Avatar
Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
Who knows?

Steel does funny things. All of my razors pass the HHT before my shave. Yet, I observed on several occasions how a razor no longer passes that test immediately after the shave. If I put them away for 24 hours, they always show an improvement of the HHT. I have even laid the hair aside, to make sure it was not an easier hair when I retried the HHT a day later.

But even with those natural restoration of sharpness, I still need to strop the razor to bring it to peak performance again.
If I strop it immediately after the shave, I can also bring the edge to the same peak performance, hence it's possible that stropping completely outweighs the advantage of blade rest. It's practically impossible to figure out.
In the old days, it was believed that blade rest was best in the long run. I never strop a blade post shaving (except for this kind of experimental investigations).

Kind regards,
Bart.
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2011-10-07 11:16
Avatar
Dr Ralfson Bwhahaha (tat2Ralfy)
Associate
Posts: 3610
I always strop on linen after shaving, just to clean the very edge, I too have heard tell of resting the blade, but I cant understand how or why this would work, steel cant sharpen itself

Regards
Ralfson (Dr)
We Are All Pioneers In Our Own Right.
The Infamous Coticule Crew
Pip Pip Old Bean
2011-10-07 14:45
Avatar
vgeorge
+1
Posts: 273
I have experienced, and also heard from others about, similar sharper-after-resting. I have also heard that the commercial pitch for a weekly set of razors had this allow-your-razor-to-rest theme.

I am speculating that increase in sharpness happens from realignment at the edge in the absence of stresses of a shave or sharpening.
George
------
Proud owner of Franz Kline Coticule from Ardennes via Bart
Hoping for Edge, Working on Bevel. © 2010
2011-10-07 17:24
Avatar
Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
iconvgeorge:
I have experienced, and also heard from others about, similar sharper-after-resting. I have also heard that the commercial pitch for a weekly set of razors had this allow-your-razor-to-rest theme.

I am speculating that increase in sharpness happens from realignment at the edge in the absence of stresses of a shave or sharpening.


My thoughts as well. I speculate that it partially does the same as a good stropping. Leo De Brouwer compares it with the cellophane of a cigarette pack. If you crush the cellophane inside your hand, once you release it, it will start to restore itself to regain its original shape. Of course it will not reach the original shape, but there clearly is some "memory" to the original shape present within the material.
Leo poses that hardened steel contains a similar memory.
If you flatten out the cellophane by rubbing it with your flat hand, you'll be able to remove the wrinkles even further. And even more if you were to iron it with mild heat. This forced kind of straightening out Leo compares to stropping.
It's a plausible theory, by my estimate. I don't know if there is any advantage in allowing the edge to releases some stresses of its own, before forcing it into shape with the strop, but it certainly won't hurt, and I actually like the tradition behind doing it that way.

Best regards,
Bart.
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2011-10-07 19:07
Avatar
Dr Ralfson Bwhahaha (tat2Ralfy)
Associate
Posts: 3610
Well there may be some truth in the relaxing back into shape theory, quite how effective that would be I have no idea?

Regards
Ralfson (Dr)
We Are All Pioneers In Our Own Right.
The Infamous Coticule Crew
Pip Pip Old Bean
2011-10-07 20:56
Avatar
Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
icontat2Ralfy:
Well there may be some truth in the relaxing back into shape theory, quite how effective that would be I have no idea?

Regards
Ralfson (Dr)

Effective enough to be detectable with a HHT. Just try it, you'll be surprised. Of course, a good stropping overrules it all, but that doesn't change the fact that blade rest does something on a noticeable level.

Kind regards,
Bart.
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2011-10-08 01:31
Avatar
Karl Smith (Karl)
From: United Kingdom
Posts: 33
Hi All,

I can confirm what you notice.

When I first started using a straight razor I used to see this barber who was 86 then and he gave me this advise:

Always keep your razor clean and dry.
You must leave it 24 hrs at least before using it again to allow the edge to recover and stand up again.
If you store your razor with the edge running parallel with the magnetic poles it will speed up the process :huh:
After several shaves you need to let it rest for a week before using so ideally you will need two or three razors.
Stropping every shave won't be absolutely necessary if you do this.

I followed this advise for sometime and it is useful to someone who don't hone their own razors, however a few laps on plain water takes seconds and completely restores the edge.

I started out with a small barber hone and when I went back to him I said my face felt like it was on fire!
He said the best hone for sensitive skin is a belgian yellow stone but I don't know where you could find one of those nowerdays.
God bless the internet and that barber!
2011-10-09 11:27
Avatar
Bart Torfs (Bart)
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 5001
Isn't it fascinating how the old wisdom blends both myth and empiric science together into one great tradition?:thumbup:

If only out of respect, my blades are granted the 24 hours rest, though not necessarily in the right polarity... :rolleyes:

:sleep:
Bart.
Then the light shone, trumpets sounded and I got to the other side, where men shave with smiles on their faces, razors pop hairs, and a continuous choir singing «~~Keen and Smooth~~» is heard everywhere. (Matt)
2011-10-09 12:58
Avatar
Karl Smith (Karl)
From: United Kingdom
Posts: 33
Yes I like to honour (and humour) the tradition.

iconQuote:
If only out of respect, my blades are granted the 24 hours rest, though not necessarily in the right polarity...


Me neither, my sense of direction isn't that good! :)
2011-10-09 13:25
Avatar
clovis
Posts: 50
Being the kind of person I am, I'd love to see some evidence eg microphotgraphs of edge to see a shape change, blind shave tests, something else? Otherwise we're on a slippery slope to pyramid power, sorcery and hogwarts "swish and flick - razor reparo!"
2011-10-09 16:15
Avatar
vgeorge
+1
Posts: 273
iconclovis:
... I'd love to see some evidence eg microphotgraphs of edge ...


I would not take any of the above as 'evidence', but consider them anecdotes, at best. Even blind shaving tests would have margin of errors that would be too much to be useful here. Until we have ready access to a Scanning Electron Microscope and perhaps an advanced metallurgy lab, I am afraid conclusive evidence will be very difficult.
George
------
Proud owner of Franz Kline Coticule from Ardennes via Bart
Hoping for Edge, Working on Bevel. © 2010
2011-10-09 16:36
Avatar
clovis
Posts: 50
Fair point my friend! Is it possible to get a SEM app for iphone:) ?
2011-10-09 16:44
Avatar
Karl Smith (Karl)
From: United Kingdom
Posts: 33
Yes I would find it interesting but as Bart said stropping completely outweighs the effect of blade resting.

If it did prolong the time between honing I wouldn't be that bothered because its no great effort for me to just do a few laps on the coti with water.

I certainly wouldn't lose any sleep over no supporting evidence thats for sure :)
2011-10-09 16:44
Avatar
danjared
Moderator
From: United States
Posts: 1000
iconKarl:

I started out with a small barber hone and when I went back to him I said my face felt like it was on fire!
He said the best hone for sensitive skin is a belgian yellow stone but I don't know where you could find one of those nowerdays.
God bless the internet and that barber!


Damn. I have no other words for this.
2011-10-09 16:56