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stalker
Posts: 106
which are for you the best bay rhum cologne??

have you ever tried trumper bay rhum?
i understand now my coticule, and i' falling love!
2011-10-25 16:36
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danjared
Moderator
From: United States
Posts: 1000
iconEmmanuel:
icondecraew:
icongeruchtemoaker:
if you do so don't forget to send me some:w00t:


I will but don't get you hopes up Stijn, those leaves are really hard to find. I did make something out of the essential oil, but I'm not quite there yet.

Emmanuel, it strikes me that your aftershave has a very high alcohol content. Did you ever add something to make it sting less (demineralised water, rosewater, orange blossom water ...) ?


It is hard find? No realy not Wim I saw them many times in the Belgium forest <feuilles de laurier>
in french.In short if is hard to find i ll send you some from greek mountains.
Normally rum has 20 to 22 degrees .Is not to much ,but if you like to dilute it you can add natural serum or demineralised water. Do not add rose water or orange blossom water because you will harm the natural aroma of bay leaves and oak wood and you know if you mix different smells and you are not
perfumer you achieve to carry out shit fragrance.
Best regards
Emmanuel


I do not know French, but based on the name, I'm assuming "laurier" refers to laurel, meaning bay laurel. This is the same as the bay leaf commonly used in cooking and is an old world plant. Pimenta racemosa is a tropical plant from the Caribbean, particularly the U.S. Virgin Islands, where bay rum originates. I would be very surprised if it is capable of growing in Belgium let alone thriving there.

Unfortunately, thanks to the effects of the US Prohibition era and the rationing of naval resources during World War II, bay rum became very scarce and is now fairly uncommon at best. This is my personal conjecture, but it might explain the use of the bay laurel leaf instead in its preparation in many so-called bay rums. I would imagine that the low demand these days makes it rather difficult to source the pimenta racemosa leaf. Maybe this would explain why D.R. Harris uses the essential oil instead.
2011-10-25 16:40
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danjared
Moderator
From: United States
Posts: 1000
iconstalker:
which are for you the best bay rhum cologne??

have you ever tried trumper bay rhum?


I got a sampler of sixteen from Barclay Crocker (many of the samples included used bay laurel, though), and I really liked the St. John's and St. Thomas bay rums. I didn't care much for Trumper's rendition, which had an unlasting scent and--if I recall correctly--stung more than usual.
2011-10-25 16:43
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danjared
Moderator
From: United States
Posts: 1000
iconEmmanuel:
I used this one :

But i think that you can use any clear rum ,never clored.
Best regards
Emmanuel


Product of Paraguay!
2011-10-25 16:45
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Wim Decraene (decraew)
Insider +1
From: Belgium
Posts: 447
icondanjared:


I do not know French, but based on the name, I'm assuming "laurier" refers to laurel, meaning bay laurel. This is the same as the bay leaf commonly used in cooking and is an old world plant. Pimenta racemosa is a tropical plant from the Caribbean, particularly the U.S. Virgin Islands, where bay rum originates. I would be very surprised if it is capable of growing in Belgium let alone thriving there.


Exactly my thoughts. I think, Emmanuel, that what you use & which grows in the wild all through the Mediterranean is Laurus Nobilis. Unless Pimenta Racemosa has been imported to Greece.

I just ordered the samples from St Johns. I'm curious !
2011-10-25 17:05
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Dr Ralfson Bwhahaha (tat2Ralfy)
Associate
Posts: 3610
iconstalker:
which are for you the best bay rhum cologne??

have you ever tried trumper bay rhum?


I have tried their soap, didnt like it much myself

as for Aftershaves, I use three, Gabels: light fragrance, dirt cheap very heavy on the clove smell. Pashana: heavier scent and longer lasting, slightly musky. and Ogallala bay rum, with peppercorn and limes, by far my favourite, longest lasting with a fresh clean smell, and it leaves my face feeling wonderful :thumbup:

Regards
Ralfson (Dr)
We Are All Pioneers In Our Own Right.
The Infamous Coticule Crew
Pip Pip Old Bean
2011-10-25 17:30
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Emmanuel Giannoulakis (Emmanuel)
Advisor
From: Greece
Posts: 942
icondanjared:
iconEmmanuel:
I used this one :

But i think that you can use any clear rum ,never clored.
Best regards
Emmanuel


Product of Paraguay!


This is not a product of Paraguay Papagayo means parrot my friend danjaret.
Best regards
Emmanuel
Emmanuel Giannoulakis
from Athens Greece
2011-10-25 18:34
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Emmanuel Giannoulakis (Emmanuel)
Advisor
From: Greece
Posts: 942
icondecraew:
icondanjared:


I do not know French, but based on the name, I'm assuming "laurier" refers to laurel, meaning bay laurel. This is the same as the bay leaf commonly used in cooking and is an old world plant. Pimenta racemosa is a tropical plant from the Caribbean, particularly the U.S. Virgin Islands, where bay rum originates. I would be very surprised if it is capable of growing in Belgium let alone thriving there.


Exactly my thoughts. I think, Emmanuel, that what you use & which grows in the wild all through the Mediterranean is Laurus Nobilis. Unless Pimenta Racemosa has been imported to Greece.

I just ordered the samples from St Johns. I'm curious !


Finally i am convinced i used Laurus Nobilis.This is the recipe i took from the old barbers ,but the result is excellent.Maybe they used this plant because the Pimenta Racemosa does not exist in Greece.
Best regards
Emmanuel
Emmanuel Giannoulakis
from Athens Greece
2011-10-25 18:42
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danjared
Moderator
From: United States
Posts: 1000
iconEmmanuel:
icondanjared:
iconEmmanuel:
I used this one :

But i think that you can use any clear rum ,never clored.
Best regards
Emmanuel


Product of Paraguay!


This is not a product of Paraguay Papagayo means parrot my friend danjaret.
Best regards
Emmanuel


But the bottle says "Product of Paraguay" right under where it says "White Rum".

There is nothing wrong with that. I just did not know that a landlocked country thousands of miles from the Caribbean made rum.
2011-10-25 18:44
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Emmanuel Giannoulakis (Emmanuel)
Advisor
From: Greece
Posts: 942
Don't forget that i am 54 now.My presbyopia do not helps me any time.Sorry my friend.
Best regards
Emmanuel
Emmanuel Giannoulakis
from Athens Greece
2011-10-25 19:10
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John Spiers (squeezyjohn)
From: United Kingdom
Posts: 84
You can get Bay essential oil from most good aromatherapy shops, it's quite common and is from Pimenta Racemosa which is a plant that cannot tolerate any freezing temperature and therefore is unlikely to be found in most of northern europe. It is a very sweet smelling plant and the oil is similar to a clove/cinnamon smell.

Apparently the history is that sailors making long journeys to the Caribbean got in to the habit of rubbing themselves all over with this bush (Pimenta Racemosa) that was abundant on the islands not only because of the sweet smell, but also because it had strong action against lice and other skin pests that could build up during weeks of sailing. The scent was so popular that a practice of steeping the leaves in rum which was being produced there to form a tonic for the skin & hair that became more complex as the makers added citrus and other spices. It then became exported to barber shops to form the Bay Rum we know today.

Bay laurel is a well know herb for cooking with and is not related.

My favourite is the Ogallala, but knowing the history and the scents involved, I don't think it's a very authentic one! It's witch hazel formula is very kind to the skin (70% rum is not!) - and the scent is lovely. My favourite is the one with Sandalwood added.

Anyway - if you get some oil and some rum then it is pretty easy to make something fairly original smelling if you want to, there are "recipes" out there on the net.

Cheers

Squeezy
I'm growing a moustache for the whole of MOVEMBER and will be raising money for men's health charities throughout the month. To see how it's getting on and details of how to donate or get involved see http://mobro.co/squeezy
2011-10-25 19:28
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chti_lolo
Posts: 376
In french pimenta racemosa = Bay Saint Thomas, EO of Bay Saint Thomas could be found here for cheap less than 5 euros for 10ml. It contains mostly eugenol so it has a scent of clove.
Emmanuel's recipe could be used with some ml of EO instead of Laurel leaves, were it no good as an AS it might also be used as punch:D
2011-10-25 19:36
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danjared
Moderator
From: United States
Posts: 1000
iconEmmanuel:
Don't forget that i am 54 now.My presbyopia do not helps me any time.Sorry my friend.
Best regards
Emmanuel


Emmanuel, 54 is still quite young. I know I make the same reading mistakes, and my vision is quite good. No worries.

However, if shipping alcohol internationally weren't so prohibitive, I would send you some good Caribbean rum. I don't know how expensive or available it is over there. (Although, given where I live, a good tequila might be more appropriate.)
2011-10-25 19:48
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geruchtemoaker
Associate
From: Belgium
Posts: 693
well that depends on what you call good rum
The Bible and several other self help or enlightenment books cite the Seven Deadly Sins. They are: pride, greed, lust, envy, wrath, sloth, and gluttony. That pretty much covers everything that we do, that is sinful... or fun for that matter. - Dave Mustaine
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2011-10-25 19:51
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danjared
Moderator
From: United States
Posts: 1000
icongeruchtemoaker:
well that depends on what you call good rum


:D :D :D

Yes, rum is quite... powerful.

I once tried making some vanilla extract using most of a bottle of Bacardi 151. (A friend bought it for a cake for its flamability and gave most of the bottle to me because she doesn't drink.) That was some powerful vanilla. I had to cut it with regular rum. Even then it was too much. I will have to try it again with something tamer and with vanilla beans from Mexico instead of from Madagascar (so my mom insists, as vanilla is from Mexico). Maybe I can make vanilla bay rum if I manage to source some leaves.
2011-10-25 19:57